At any moment, the human brain processes many pieces of information like sounds, smells or sights, and then turns them into a single experience. Scientists have identified areas of the brain involved in pathways with specific functions like these. These pathways intersect at hubs that likely play a major role in brain processing, but the exact interaction is unknown yet. In the Turn Off Your Perception activity, a video of a hospital scene is shown. On the left, one female nurse is seated at a desk, while another female nurse stands. They speak to each other, and the standing nurse points to a clipboard she is holding. On the right, a male doctor and a female doctor stand and speak together. The male doctor holds a notebook that they each read and gesture at while speaking. Play the video to listen to the conversation between the two doctors. There is also a graphic representation of a human head seen from the back. A pink representation of the brain is shown, with purple areas that correspond to areas of the brain involved in pathways with specific functions. On the left side of the brain, from top to bottom, there are five areas that control the following functions: One Right Peripheral Vision. Two Language. Three Hearing. Four Right Motion. Five Right Vision. On the right side of the brain, from top to bottom, there are four areas highlighted that control the following: One Left Peripheral Vision. Two Hearing. Three Left Motion. Four Left Vision. Each area has a corresponding button, which can be selected to turn off that particular function – or perception. The video can then be played with those perceptions missing. For instance, if Right Peripheral Vision, Right Motion and Hearing are all selected, the video will play with the right side blurred with slow motion, and no sound.
TURN OFF YOUR PERCEPTION NOW

After you watch the video, you’ll be able to turn off various types of perception to see how the experience changes.

You have turned off:

Right Side Peripheral Vision Language Hearing Right Side Motion Right Side Vision Left Side Peripheral Vision Left Side Motion Left Side Vision
Left Side
Right Side

Watch the scene in the video. Then try turning off parts of the brain (choose up to three), and see how the scene changes.

Your Brain Creates Your World

At this very moment, you are processing many strands of information. You are reading this sentence, while simultaneously sensing all the sights, sounds, and smells around you. How does the brain turn all of the input into a single experience?

Scientists have identified brain regions involved in pathways with specific functions, like the ones you see here. Some regions of the brain receive multiple strands of information. Other regions only process single strands. We know these pathways intersect at hubs that probably play a major role in brain processing, but we do not yet know how all pathways end or exactly how they weave together.

Watch the scene in the video.

Then try turning off parts of the brain by selecting up to three buttons, and watch the video again.

Experiment with turning off different parts of the brain by selecting or deselecting different combinations of buttons, and watch how they change the scene in the video each time.

Watch the scene in the video.

Then try turning off parts of the brain by selecting up to three buttons, and watch the video again.

Experiment with turning off different parts of the brain by selecting or deselecting different combinations of buttons, and watch how they change the scene in the video each time.